Stanford Researchers’ Cooling Glove Boosts Exercise Recovery


Stanford University.
I got heated up in a hot room in 140 degrees. Ran about three miles.
Feels like you’re going through a run in a desert Normally, it would take a while to
get his core temp to back down to normal. What we’re doing now is to cool subject
off at a much faster rate with a cooling device that we have put on his palm.
How you’re doing? Our major heat exchange surfaces in the
body are, are palms of our hands, the soles of our feet and our face.
And the reason is that these skin surfaces are under lane by very special blood
vessels. The device that we have, which we call
rapid thermal exchange or RTX, imposes a vacuum on that surface.
It’s about what you can suck through a straw.
And then, the cool blood from the heat exchange surface goes back into the core.
The skin temperature is much darker so he’s cooled down quite rapidly.
We’ve done endurance, treadmill work in the heat.
We’ve done bench press studies, We’ve done pull up studies.
And in all cases, what we can do by extracting heat from one hand is we can
dramatically improve performance. What we were able to do is compare the
rate of conditioning improvement, whether strength or work capacity with our
technique with what’s been published on steroids.
And our rates are much higher. You definitely can feel the difference.
You definitely can work out a little longer.
The next time you come in you’re feel better, feeling stronger.
You can reach your maximum performance capacity without using performance
enhancing drugs. For more, please visit us at stanford.edu.

100 thoughts on “Stanford Researchers’ Cooling Glove Boosts Exercise Recovery

  1. so basically, take a cold shower after your workout, should have the same effect. No glove that's likely to be overpriced if it ends up in retail = )

  2. If there is a portable version of this…infinite jogging time.

    This might juuust be DIY-able. Just needs a jar + vacuum cleaner + water hand pump.

  3. Thank you for the tip. I did read it and now I can see the point of this device^^ They should explain such a thing in the video haha = )

  4. Absolutely, but some people with MS have body temperature control problems. Bringing your temperature back to normal when you body can't do it will certainly help a person function better.

    Here they are claiming that blood cooling in healthy people is anabolic. You are also right that blood vessel constriction can interfere with cooling, but again a hot healthy people are vasodilated and not vasoconstricted. A cool shower or even aspirin will cool them down quite rapidly.

  5. A mitt-shaped vacuum around the palm expands many small veins close to the surface that act as radiators. As more blood flows into the veins, cool water in the lining causes its temperature to fall, in turn cooling the body.

    This is far more effective than ice water, since it will merely cause the veins to constrict, in effect increasing body heat.

  6. We'll freeze your hand, suck all the air out around it, and you'll be benching 165 by your next workout. Oh and this guy was benching a bamboo stick with 2 leafs when he was on the juice before we froze his hand.

  7. Thanks, I came to understand that after my comment was posted and yes you are correct, but most of my other concerns stand.

  8. I admit I am not currently active but i have designed and implemented experiments with humans subjects. Not in sports physiology but in neuropsychology and I have a degree in biology, so i am not clueless.

  9. Sounds like standing in a cool room would work but not nearly as efficiently as taking advantage of the networks of veins in the hands, known as AVAs (arteriovenous anastomoses), that seem to be exclusively devoted to rapid temperature management.

  10. So, would freezing a bottle of water and holding it between sets produce a similar effect? Got to be worth a try.

  11. In the latest prototype of the device, a mitt-shaped vacuum around the palm expands many small veins close to the surface that act as radiators. As more blood flows into the veins, cool water in the lining causes its temperature to fall, in turn cooling the body.

    This is far more effective than ice water, since it will merely cause the veins to constrict, in effect increasing body heat.

  12. Um, so Ben Hoffman is sexy and fit but he isn't as big as guys on steroids. I'm sure this cooling thing has its place in recovery but the lame "use us not 'roids" gambit is just a lame angle to get their research funded.

  13. Nope. Cold against the skin causes vasoconstriction as the body tries to preserve warmth and maintain homeostasis. The vacuum contraption forces vasodilation of surface blood vessels, so you're cooling the blood not the skin.

  14. Yup. This. College athlete like that could put 50lb on his bench in a semester without any drugs or anything. Hard to see how him making some gains proves anything about the contraption.

  15. What if I take a bucket with ice water, drill a hole into it to suck the air out and create a vacuum and put my hand in there? Would work as well, wouldn't it..bucket would have to be airproof obviously..

  16. Darpa developed this about a decade ago. I remember reading about this in Wired while I was in Afghanistan. It not only super cools your blood but also allows your body to recover faster between workouts or rigorous exertion. They basically saw our bodies sweat glands as inefficient and wanted to improve the process a bonus was that it helps oxygenate the blood which allows your muscles to recover faster since fatigue is just lack of oxygen which causes lactic acid build up.

  17. I dont think that would work as well. If you cool down your whole hand, the blood vessels will contract and reduce blood flow. With the palm thing it's only… ah fuck it I don't know what I'm talking about lol

  18. Bullshit, it's not yet proven.

    So let's get a real study instead of this bullshit done and see if it actually has some improving
    effect on recovery.

  19. So, does this device have practical applications regarding healing time?? And if this ends up having some kind of legitimate science behind, will this be out for the common man at any point??

  20. Im guessing from your statement that you have not read the research abstract or methodology they used?

    If you did you would notice why.

  21. It would be a shame for you not to bulk up when these normal people do it easily using Max Muscle Extend (Google it).

  22. based on the fact that holding a bottle of water between set decreases your waiting time between sets.

    So do that, hold your bottle between sets next time to cool down.

  23. They sell a commercial version through AvaCore, but I guess they're between models – the next version is suppose to be released by spring. The old one had a wonky twist-turn airlock system to form a seal for the vacuum; the new one just uses grippy rubber like in the video.

  24. "This is far more effective than ice water, since it will merely cause the veins to constrict, in effect increasing body heat."

  25. I'm just waiting for the glue to dry on mine. I don't think it will work. I hope it does, but I don't think it will.
    🙂

  26. Hey YouTubers, have you experienced Atomic Max Muscle? (Google it) You will find out about the crimes we commit against our bodies. With Atomic Max Muscle, you will discover how to get ripped fast.

  27. can anyone link me to the website where i can buy one of these? i'm anatural bodybuilder and this would surely help me

  28. "you can reach your maximum performance capacity without using performance enhancing drugs" You're right..but performance enhancing drugs take you well beyond your natural capacity

  29. If you where able to workout twice as much as you normally would, would the risk of injury increase? Is muscle fatigue solely because of overheating? I would think not, otherwise you would be able to workout indefintly with the cooling gloves. Does the fact that MPK is heat-sensitive serve another purpose other than preventing your muscles from overheating?

  30. Cooling only applies in high intensity workouts like running or cycling. There is no need for cooling in low intensity workouts like weightlifting.

  31. I'm considering this for powerlifting. I max out on at least 1 of the 3 lifts per week. Perhaps this will help CNS recover quicker? Raw squat is extremely taxing. If this thing helps it would be well worth it.

  32. cheap vacuum pump tube like on a foodsaver , plastic bag , adhesive tape , ice packs . =50 million dollars in DARPA research lol

  33. What is the difference, in terms of results, between the cooling glove and pressing ice/cold water in your hand? The results would be the same?

  34. You can replicate these same results with ice and water in an ice chest. Dunk you hand in for 60 seconds and your body cools off faster.

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